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Paginating Data

Table of contents

  1. Next Fetch
    1. Usage Example
    2. Example with limit
  2. Query cursor
    1. Example Usage
    2. Important Note
  3. Start After
  4. Start At
  5. End Before
  6. End At

FireO split data returned by a query into batches according to the parameters you define in your query.

Next Fetch

You can easily fetch next batch by using next_fetch() method.

Usage Example

cities = City.collection.filter('state', '==', 'CA').order('population').fetch(10)

# Print first 10 cities with this matching condition
for city in cities:
    print(city)

# Fetch next batch
cities.next_fetch()

# Print 10 more cities with this matching condition
for city in cities:
    print(city)

You can call next_fetch() method as many time as you want until the records finish. In next_fetch() you can also change the limit. But this limit is only for this fetch and will not effect further next_fetch()

Example with limit

cities = City.collection.filter('state', '==', 'CA').order('population').fetch(10)

# Print first 10 cities with this matching condition
for city in cities:
    print(city)

# Fetch next batch
cities.next_fetch(5)

# Print 5 more cities with this matching condition
for city in cities:
    print(city)

# Another next fetch batch
cities.next_fetch()

# Print more 10 cities with this matching condition
for city in cities:
    print(city)

Query cursor

This is powerful tool by FireO. You can create cursor from your query and save it as string and use it later.

Example Usage

cities = City.collection.filter('state', '==', 'CA').order('population').fetch(10)

# city list contain the first 10 matching cities
city_list = list(cities)

city_cursor = cities.cursor

cities.cursor return the string that you can use later at some place to start the query at this specific point.

# Fetch another 10 cities 
cities = City.collection.cursor(city_cursor).fetch()

for city in cities:
    print(city)

You can also change the limit when using fetch() unlike next_fetch() this will effect the further fetch()

# Fetch another 5 cities 
cities = City.collection.cursor(city_cursor).fetch(5)

city_list = list(cities)

city_cursor = cities.cursor

# it will fetch the next 5 cities
cities = City.collection.cursor(city_cursor).fetch()

for city in cities:
    print(city)

Important Note

cursor use the last document or offset to point the query. It is recommend to use the last document for further fetch batches. You need to understand how to create cursor with last document

cities = City.collection.filter('state', '==', 'CA').order('population').fetch(10)

offset_cursor = cities.cursor

# city list contain the first 10 matching cities
city_list = list(cities)

last_doc_cursor = cities.cursor

print(offset_cursor)
print(last_doc_cursor)

You will see both cursor are different generating from same query. If you call the cities.cursor before consuming the cities then cursor save the offset for next fetch because it does not know the last document until you use all the results generating from the query.

Important tip always save cursor after using the results if possible

Start After

Use the start_after() methods to define the start point for a query.

For example if you use start_after(A) it returns alphabet from B-Z

Usage Example

cities = City.collection.order('state').start_after(population=1000000)

You can also pass the model key to define the query point where to start

Example

cities = City.collection.order('state').start_after(key=model.key)

Start At

Use the start_at() methods to define the start point for a query.

For example if you use start_at(A) it returns entire alphabet.

Usage Example

cities = City.collection.order('state').start_at(population=1000000)

End Before

Use the end_before() methods to define the end point for a query.

Usage Example

cities = City.collection.order('state').end_before(population=1000000)

End At

Use the end_at() methods to define where to end the query.

Usage Example

cities = City.collection.order('state').end_at(population=1000000)